YA Lit Gets Political (Trending In YA #1)

Posted February 7, 2020 by Amber in Trending In YA / 2 Comments

Ya gets political trending in yaHi everyone.

I am so glad it’s Friday and in honor of it being Friday I’m going to

A. Sleep in (Ha, I wish, alas, bills need paid, I must work).

B. Start a new feature.

I am beginning a new feature which will discuss YA bookish trends I notice. I’ve been wanting to do this feature forever but I’m not always the best feature starter but this year, that is all changing.

As you may know from my features, Wondrous Covers WednesdaysWondrous Covers Wednesdays and Bookish Lists, I love spotting similarities in books. Trending In YA is a feature where I will discuss trends regarding titles, covers, plot elements, random aspects of books, and more. 

It’s no surprise that as 2020 starts and we begin another election year that there are more books coming out dealing with politics. I think it’s really important that we have books on politics and characters speaking out. Teens are inspiring and on the movie. It gives me hope as an adult that teens are so involved in political aspects whether it’s on a local or larger scale. There are so many outlets to do this, calling representatives or emailing (which is something I’ve struggled with), donating, speaking to people in real life, Twitter, etc.

The books below are about various things from volunteering, phone-banking, parents running for office and even school elections.

We have these 2020 books coming out:

Yes No Maybe So by Becky Albertalli and Aisha Saeed (Released February 4th, 2020)

YES
Jamie Goldberg is cool with volunteering for his local state senate candidate—as long as he’s behind the scenes. When it comes to speaking to strangers (or, let’s face it, speaking at all to almost anyone), Jamie’s a choke artist. There’s no way he’d ever knock on doors to ask people for their votes…until he meets Maya.

NO
Maya Rehman’s having the worst Ramadan ever. Her best friend is too busy to hang out, her summer trip is canceled, and now her parents are separating. Why her mother thinks the solution to her problems is political canvassing—with some awkward dude she hardly knows—is beyond her.

MAYBE SO
Going door to door isn’t exactly glamorous, but maybe it’s not the worst thing in the world. After all, the polls are getting closer—and so are Maya and Jamie. Mastering local activism is one thing. Navigating the cross-cultural romance of the century is another thing entirely.

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Most Likely (#1) by Sarah Watson (Releases March 10th, 2020)

From the creator of the hit TV series The Bold Type comes an empowering and heartfelt novel about a future female president’s senior year of high school.

Ava, CJ, Jordan, and Martha (listed in alphabetical order out of fairness) have been friends since kindergarten. Now they’re in their senior year, facing their biggest fears about growing up and growing apart. But there’s more than just college on the horizon. One of these girls is destined to become the president of the United States.The mystery, of course, is which girl gets the gig.

Is it Ava, the picture-perfect artist who’s secretly struggling to figure out where she belongs? Or could it be CJ, the one who’s got everything figured out…except how to fix her terrible SAT scores? Maybe it’s Jordan, the group’s resident journalist, who knows she’s ready for more than their small Ohio suburb can offer. And don’t overlook Martha, who will have to overcome all the obstacles that stand in the way of her dreams.

This is the story of four best friends who have one another’s backs through every new love, breakup, stumble, and success–proving that great friendships can help young women achieve anything…even a seat in the Oval Office.

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Running by Natalia Sylvester

RunningWhen fifteen-year-old Cuban American Mariana Ruiz’s father runs for president, Mari starts to see him with new eyes. A novel about waking up and standing up, and what happens when you stop seeing your dad as your hero—while the whole country is watching.

In this thoughtful, authentic, humorous, and gorgeously written novel about privacy, waking up, and speaking up, Senator Anthony Ruiz is running for president. Throughout his successful political career he has always had his daughter’s vote, but a presidential campaign brings a whole new level of scrutiny to sheltered fifteen-year-old Mariana and the rest of her Cuban American family, from a 60 Minutes–style tour of their house to tabloids doctoring photos and inventing scandals. As tensions rise within the Ruiz family, Mari begins to learn about the details of her father’s political positions, and she realizes that her father is not the man she thought he was.

But how do you find your voice when everyone’s watching? When it means disagreeing with your father—publicly? What do you do when your dad stops being your hero? Will Mari get a chance to confront her father? If she does, will she have the courage to seize it?

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The State Of Us by Shaun David Hutchinson (Releases June 2nd, 2020 from Harper Teen)

When Dean Arnault’s mother decided to run for president, it wasn’t a surprise to anyone, least of all her son. But still that doesn’t mean Dean wants to be part of the public spectacle that is the race for the White House—at least not until he meets Dre.

The only problem is that Dre Rosario’s on the opposition; he’s the son of the Democratic nominee. But as Dean and Dre’s meet-ups on the campaign trail become less left to chance, their friendship quickly becomes a romantic connection unlike any either of the boys have ever known.

If it wasn’t hard enough falling in love across the aisle, the political scheming of a shady third-party candidate could cause Dean and Dre’s world to explode around them.

It’s a new modern-day, star-crossed romance about what it really means to love your country—and yourself—from the acclaimed author of We Are the Ants and Brave Face, Shaun David Hutchinson.

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You Say It First by Katie Cotugno (Releases June 16th, 2020 from Balzer + Bray)

You Say It FirstMeg has her entire life set up perfectly: her boyfriend Mason is sweet and supportive, she and her best friend Emily plan to head to Cornell together in the fall, and she even finds time to clock shifts phonebanking at a voter registration call center in her Philadelphia suburb. But everything changes when one of those calls connects her to a stranger from small-town Ohio, who gets under her skin from the moment he picks up the phone.

Colby is stuck in a rut, reeling from a family tragedy and working a dead-end job—unsure what his future holds, or if he even cares. The last thing he has time for is some privileged rich girl preaching the sanctity of the political process. So he says the worst thing he can think of and hangs up.

But things don’t end there.…

That night on the phone winds up being the first in a series of candid, sometimes heated, always surprising conversations that lead to a long-distance friendship and then—slowly—to something more. Across state lines and phone lines, Meg and Colby form a once-in-a-lifetime connection. But in the end, are they just too different to make it work?

You Say It First is a propulsive, layered novel about how sometimes the person who has the least in common with us can be the one who changes us most.

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The Voting Booth by Brandy Colbert (Releases July 7th, 2020 from Disney-Hyperion)

The Voting BoothFrom Stonewall Award-winning author Brandy Colbert comes an all-in-one-day love story perfect for fans of The Sun is Also A Star.
Marva Sheridan was born ready for this day. She’s always been driven to make a difference in the world, and what better way than to vote in her first election?
Duke Crenshaw is do done with this election. He just wants to get voting over with so he can prepare for his band’s first paying gig tonight.
Only problem? Duke can’t vote.
When Marva sees Duke turned away from their polling place, she takes it upon herself to make sure his vote is counted. She hasn’t spent months doorbelling and registering voters just to see someone denied their right. And that’s how their whirlwind day begins, rushing from precinct to precinct, cutting school, waiting in endless lines, turned away time and again, trying to do one simple thing: vote. They may have started out as strangers, but as Duke and Marva team up to beat a rigged system (and find Marva’s missing cat), it’s clear that there’s more to their connection than a shared mission for democracy.
Romantic and triumphant, The Voting Booth is proof that you can’t sit around waiting for the world to change? But some things are just meant to be.

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Sources Say by Lori Goldstein (Release September 8th, 2020 from Penguin/Razorbill)

Sources SayTwo exes. One election. All the drama.

For fans of Becky Albertalli and Morgan Matson comes a funny, heartfelt novel about feuding exes running for class president and the scandal that makes the previously boring school election the newest trending hashtag.

At Acedia High School outside of Boston, student council has always been nothing more than a popularity contest. Nobody pays attention. Nobody cares.

But all that changes when the Frankengirls show up. During the very first week of school, someone plasters the halls with Photoshopped images of three “perfect tens”–images of scantily clad girls made from real photos of girls at school. The student body is livid. And the two presidential candidates, Angeline Quinn and Leo Torres, jump on the opportunity to propose their solutions and secure votes. After their messy break up, Leo and Angie are fighting tooth and nail to win this thing and their constituents are mesmerized as they duke it out.

As if things couldn’t be more dramatic, the school’s two newspapers get involved. The Red & Blue is run by Angie’s sister Cat and she prides herself on only reporting the facts. But her morals are tested when The Shrieking Violet–written by an anonymous source and based less on facts and more on fiction–blatantly endorses Leo. Rumors fly, secrets are leaked, and the previously mundane student election becomes anything but boring.

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I noticed this final book in a book deal and I can’t wait to read it. The details are not final yet but here’s what we know:

Cover Yet To Be RevealedThe (Un)Popular Vote by Jasper Sanchez

Tentative Publication: Summer of 2021

Mabel Hsu at HarperCollins/Tegen has bought, at auction, in a two-book deal, The (Un)Popular Vote by debut author Jasper Sanchez.

Pitched as Red, White & Royal Blue meets The West Wing, this YA contemporary novel follows a transmasculine teenager who defies his congressman father and runs in a three-way brawl for class president.

Publication is planned for summer 2021;

Claire Friedman at InkWell Management brokered the deal for world English rights.

 

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We even have middle grade elections happening:

The Campaign by Laurie Friedman (Releases September, 2020 from Running Press Kids)

Amanda Adams has always dreamed of running for class president. Her mom is a member of Congress and her dad is a political strategist who manages her mother’s campaign. Politics is in her DNA. She has the perfect VP in mind for the school ticket—her best friend Meghan Hart. But when Amanda finds out that Meghan has political ambitions of her own, these two best friends suddenly find themselves on opposite sides of the aisle, and, as each girl mounts her campaign, it’s clear the gloves are about to come off. As the rest of their classmates begin to choose sides, the girls realize how they carry themselves over the coming weeks will have a lasting impact on the outcome.

 

 

 

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Here are a few backlist titles:

Red, White & Royal Blue is an New Adult Title.

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I love that we have so many books coming out with politics in so many different ways. I can’t wait to see how these books will inspire teens and myself as well. I know I’ll be reaching for each and every one of these stories to get me through the election year. Have you read any of them yet? Do you know of any other political YA Books? What book are you looking forward to most? Let me know in the comments.

Posted February 7, 2020 by Amber in Trending In YA / 2 Comments

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2 responses to “YA Lit Gets Political (Trending In YA #1)

  1. I love this too! SO. MUCH. I mean, first of all, imparting the importance of voting and being active in the process on the younger generation is SO important. Because they’re all going to be of voting age, and in some cases, are! And even for us older folks, it’s a great reminder that we CAN do more to be active. And I for one am 150% here for authors getting this important topic out there.

    Shannon @ It Starts at Midnight recently posted: Unity Days 2020
    • Amber

      Yesss, It is such an exciting year for politic books. The agents of like…the last four years, really knew what they were doing when buying these. Ha. It is so important and I’m so happy they’re be able to read these and feel inspired and hopeful and ACTIVE. Teens are so active. And I love the authors writing these books of course.

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